District Digest News Stories

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Tag: Valerie McCormack
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  • September

    Nashville District archaeologists encourage public to preserve the past

    NASHVILLE, Tenn. (Sept. 8, 2018) – Archaeologists Jordan McIntyre and Valerie McCormack hosted an “ArchaeoMyth Busters” table for Tennessee Archaeology Day today at Bells Bend Park to encourage the public to preserve the past.
  • May

    Corps invites public to hike rediscovered segment of Trail of Tears

    SMYRNA, Tenn. (May 13, 2015) – The forced removal of Cherokee Indians east of the Mississippi River in 1838 to Indian Territory in present-day Oklahoma is described by the Cherokee Nation today as the “trail where they cried.” A rediscovered segment of the Trail of Tears near the East Fork Recreation Area is providing new insight into what they experienced during the journey across Tennessee.
  • April

    McCormack named Nashville District February 2015 Employee of the Month

    NASHVILLE, Tenn., April 20, 2015 – Valerie McCormack, archeologist, Project Planning Branch, Environmental Section, is the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Nashville District Employee of the Month for February 2015.
  • January

    Music City workshop tunes up tribal consultations

    NASHVILLE, Tenn. (Jan. 16, 2015) – State and federal agency representatives met in Music City this week to tune up and improve how they consult with tribal nations in a workshop hosted by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Nashville District.
  • February

    Corps employees save tax dollars at Moccasin Bend

    CHATTANOOGA, Tenn. (Feb. 27, 2013) – A bank stabilization project on a 1,500-foot stretch along the Tennessee River at Moccasin Bend is nearing completion, and U.S. Army Corps of Engineers employees are saving taxpayer dollars in the process.
  • April

    Class equips Corps employees with tools to safeguard nation’s historical treasures

    NASHVILLE, Tenn. (April 5, 2012) -- Some of the nation’s most valuable historical treasures are located on U.S. Army Corps of Engineers lands right here in the Nashville District. Preserving and protecting these significant resources is so essential that Corps employees recently received specialized training that equipped them with the tools necessary to safeguard archaeological sites.