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Jackson gets general overview of Nashville District construction projects

Nashville District Public Affairs
Published March 31, 2016
Martin Parker, site manager for Voith Hydro, explains the roles of a lamination sheet within a generator core with Maj. Gen. Donald Jackson during his visit to the Center Hill Hydropower Rehabilitation Project in Lancaster, Tenn., March 29, 2016.

Martin Parker, site manager for Voith Hydro, explains the roles of a lamination sheet within a generator core with Maj. Gen. Donald Jackson during his visit to the Center Hill Hydropower Rehabilitation Project in Lancaster, Tenn., March 29, 2016.

Maj. Gen. Donald Jackson, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers deputy commanding general for Civil and Emergency Operations, and the students look at the Center Hill Power House from the observation deck.  Loren McDonald, project manager and assistant program manager for the Nashville District Section 212 Program, explained to the group how a turbine and generator function.

Maj. Gen. Donald Jackson, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers deputy commanding general for Civil and Emergency Operations, and the students look at the Center Hill Power House from the observation deck. Loren McDonald, project manager and assistant program manager for the Nashville District Section 212 Program, explained to the group how a turbine and generator function.

Joshua Vaden (left) and Alexander King (right), mechanical engineering students at Tennessee Technological University, view a diagram of Nashville District’s Cumberland River System at the Center Hill Dam Power Plant March 29, 2016.

Joshua Vaden (left) and Alexander King (right), mechanical engineering students at Tennessee Technological University, view a diagram of Nashville District’s Cumberland River System at the Center Hill Dam Power Plant March 29, 2016.

The group views the 66-year-old rotor removed from hydropower unit 2 at the Center Hill Dam Power Plant in Lancaster, Tenn., March 29, 2016.  They were able to see the progress made on refurbishing the rotor.

The group views the 66-year-old rotor removed from hydropower unit 2 at the Center Hill Dam Power Plant in Lancaster, Tenn., March 29, 2016. They were able to see the progress made on refurbishing the rotor.

John Keith, electrician at Center Hill Power Plant, receives an award from Maj. Gen. Donald Jackson for his outstanding dedication and work ethic.  The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers deputy commanding general for Civil and Emergency Operations toured the project March 29, 2016.

John Keith, electrician at Center Hill Power Plant, receives an award from Maj. Gen. Donald Jackson for his outstanding dedication and work ethic. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers deputy commanding general for Civil and Emergency Operations toured the project March 29, 2016.

Bill DeBruyn, Center Hill project resident engineer, explains future work plans on the Saddle Dam to mechanical engineering students during a tour of the project March 29, 2016.

Bill DeBruyn, Center Hill project resident engineer, explains future work plans on the Saddle Dam to mechanical engineering students during a tour of the project March 29, 2016.

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (March 31, 2016) – The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers deputy commanding general for Civil and Emergency Operations visited a Nashville District project for the first time to interact with project managers and engineers.

Maj. Gen. Donald E. Jackson Jr. toured the Center Hill Dam Safety Rehabilitation Project and the Center Hill Dam Power Plant in Lancaster, Tenn.  He also stopped by the Nashville District Headquarters for briefings, and to meet and recognize top performers with coin presentations.

Jimmy Waddle, Nashville District Engineering and Construction Division chief, welcomed Jackson and 13 engineering students from Vanderbilt and Tennessee Technological Universities. 

Linda Adcock, project manager for the Center Hill Dam Safety Rehabilitation Project, briefed Jackson and the students on the overall construction and installation of a concrete barrier wall and future work on the Saddle Dam.  

“Today was an important day to provide our the group with a better understanding of how the Saddle Dam remediation fits into the overall Center Hill project and to reduce risk and keep these projects functioning,” said Adcock.  “This visit allowed them to learn about the main dam Barrier Wall construction and about future work on the Saddle Dam.” 

The $364 million project was designed to fix seepage problems in the foundation of the earthen portions of the dam. The contractor, Bauer Foundation Corporation, installed a permanent barrier wall as the long-term solution to stop the seepage and keep the earthen main dam safe.

Jamie James, Nashville District Hydropower project manager and Loren McDonald, project manager and assistant program manager for the Nashville District Section 212 Program, briefed the general and group about the ongoing work on the multi Turbine Generator Rehabilitation Project at Center Hill Dam.

The contractor, Voith Hydro, mobilized to the dam in July 2015, started disassembly process of the first unit and the other two units will follow. It will take three years to complete the project. Unit two is the first of 28 units at nine projects that will be rehabilitated over the next 20 years.

“We are very excited for the students to see this work,” McDonald said.  “We’re all very happy this will become a common occurrence as we are able to go through the units one by one to rehab the system and increase the reliability.”

Jody Craig, Center Hill Power Plant superintendent, welcomed the group to the Center Hill Dam Hydroelectric Power Plant.  He explained the work process of removing the 82-ton steel wheel turbine and coordination efforts with Voith Hydro.

“I’m glad they had the opportunity to witness this event,” said Craig.  “It’s important that we show them how the power plant works and many components we plan to replace with this massive job. I think he (Jackson) and the students enjoyed the tour and communicated his objectives for the program well.”

Alexander King, ROTC engineering student at Tennessee Technological University, said the tour provided the real testament for the engineers of the past who used a pen and paper to design the generators with remarkable accuracy without the advantage of today’s technology.

“I’m glad to be here and it was a great to see the work and how old technology is replaced by modern innovation,” said King.

Jackson was fascinated by the student’s interest in knowledge, and he seemed to relish talking with them.  The general said he was equally impressed by their attentiveness to comments and asking good questions.

“I hope the students will gain an appreciation and importance in what they are studying in their highly technical subjects,” said Jackson. “There is a place for these students in the future of our nation and I hope addressing the infrastructure challenges on the tour will better help them understand the importance of engineering.”

The general then traveled to the Nashville District headquarters to meet employees and to recognize individuals for their outstanding duty and performance. 

“It’s an honor and humbling experience to say thanks for all the hard work and dedication you do to making this district better,” said Jackson. “I’m always impressed by the districts and the Corps of Engineers.  I’m constantly amazed by the people, districts, missions, the things we are able to do, things we do for our nation and the challenges we are able to overcome every day.”

(For more news, updates and information, visit the districts website at www.lrn.usace.army.mil, on Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/nashvillecorps or Twitter at http://www.twitter.com/nashvillecorps.)