District Digest News Stories

Kentucky Lock lower miter gates are beehive of activity

Nashville District Public Affairs
Published Aug. 19, 2013
Seven workers pass scaffolding sections up the chamber side of Kentucky Lock’s lower miter gate Aug. 19, 2013. The wraparound scaffold is being assembled to permit TVA-contracted GUBMK Constructors to sandblast, make any needed internal structural repairs, and paint the 91-foot tall miter gates. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Nashville District employees dewatered the 69-year-old, 110-by-600-foot lock and will inspect the culvert valves and all other areas of the lock that are normally underwater for any needed repairs. Corps employees will also replace the tow haulage system, used to move unpowered sections of barge tows through the lock. Kentucky lock is scheduled to resume normal operation at noon, Sept. 24, 2013.

Seven workers pass scaffolding sections up the chamber side of Kentucky Lock’s lower miter gate Aug. 19, 2013. The wraparound scaffold is being assembled to permit TVA-contracted GUBMK Constructors to sandblast, make any needed internal structural repairs, and paint the 91-foot tall miter gates. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Nashville District employees dewatered the 69-year-old, 110-by-600-foot lock and will inspect the culvert valves and all other areas of the lock that are normally underwater for any needed repairs. Corps employees will also replace the tow haulage system, used to move unpowered sections of barge tows through the lock. Kentucky lock is scheduled to resume normal operation at noon, Sept. 24, 2013.

Eight workers assemble a scaffold adjacent to a wraparound scaffold on the tailwater side of Kentucky Lock’s lower miter gates Aug. 19, 2013. The scaffolds are being assembled to permit TVA-contracted GUBMK Constructors to sandblast, make any needed internal structural repairs, and paint the 91-foot tall miter gates. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Nashville District employees dewatered the 69-year-old, 110-by-600-foot lock and will inspect the culvert valves and all other areas of the lock that are normally underwater for any needed repairs. Corps employees will also replace the tow haulage system, used to move unpowered sections of barge tows through the lock. Kentucky lock is scheduled to resume normal operation at noon, Sept. 24, 2013.

Eight workers assemble a scaffold adjacent to a wraparound scaffold on the tailwater side of Kentucky Lock’s lower miter gates Aug. 19, 2013. The scaffolds are being assembled to permit TVA-contracted GUBMK Constructors to sandblast, make any needed internal structural repairs, and paint the 91-foot tall miter gates. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Nashville District employees dewatered the 69-year-old, 110-by-600-foot lock and will inspect the culvert valves and all other areas of the lock that are normally underwater for any needed repairs. Corps employees will also replace the tow haulage system, used to move unpowered sections of barge tows through the lock. Kentucky lock is scheduled to resume normal operation at noon, Sept. 24, 2013.

This view of Kentucky Lock’s lower miter gates should give the reader an idea of the size of the 91-feet tall gates that close off the lower end of the dewatered 110-by-600-foot navigational lock. The wraparound scaffold is being assembled to permit TVA-contracted GUBMK Constructors to sandblast, make any needed internal structural repairs, and paint the 91-foot tall miter gates. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Nashville District employees dewatered the 69-year-old, 110-by-600-foot lock and will inspect the culvert valves and all other areas of the lock that are normally underwater for any needed repairs. Corps employees will also replace the tow haulage system, used to move unpowered sections of barge tows through the lock. Kentucky lock is scheduled to resume normal operation at noon, Sept. 24, 2013.

This view of Kentucky Lock’s lower miter gates should give the reader an idea of the size of the 91-feet tall gates that close off the lower end of the dewatered 110-by-600-foot navigational lock. The wraparound scaffold is being assembled to permit TVA-contracted GUBMK Constructors to sandblast, make any needed internal structural repairs, and paint the 91-foot tall miter gates. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Nashville District employees dewatered the 69-year-old, 110-by-600-foot lock and will inspect the culvert valves and all other areas of the lock that are normally underwater for any needed repairs. Corps employees will also replace the tow haulage system, used to move unpowered sections of barge tows through the lock. Kentucky lock is scheduled to resume normal operation at noon, Sept. 24, 2013.

This view from inside the upper end of Kentucky Lock should give the reader an idea of the enormity of the 110-by-600-foot chamber. The lock as been dewatered to permit TVA-contracted GUBMK Constructors to sandblast, make any needed internal structural repairs, and paint the 91-foot tall miter gates at the lower end. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Nashville District employees dewatered the 69-year-old, 110-by-600-foot lock and will inspect the culvert valves and all other areas of the lock that are normally underwater for any needed repairs. Corps employees will also replace the tow haulage system, used to move unpowered sections of barge tows through the lock. Kentucky lock is scheduled to resume normal operation at noon, Sept. 24, 2013.

This view from inside the upper end of Kentucky Lock should give the reader an idea of the enormity of the 110-by-600-foot chamber. The lock as been dewatered to permit TVA-contracted GUBMK Constructors to sandblast, make any needed internal structural repairs, and paint the 91-foot tall miter gates at the lower end. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Nashville District employees dewatered the 69-year-old, 110-by-600-foot lock and will inspect the culvert valves and all other areas of the lock that are normally underwater for any needed repairs. Corps employees will also replace the tow haulage system, used to move unpowered sections of barge tows through the lock. Kentucky lock is scheduled to resume normal operation at noon, Sept. 24, 2013.

Kentucky Lock’s upper miter gates at the top of this photo play a very significant role while maintenance repairs are being made in the dewatered chamber. They are holding back the waters of not only Kentucky Lake, but also of Lake Barkley as the Barkley Canal joins the two lakes upstream of their respective dams. The lock has been dewatered to permit TVA-contracted GUBMK Constructors to sandblast, make any needed internal structural repairs, and paint the 91-foot tall miter gates at the lower end. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Nashville District employees dewatered the 69-year-old, 110-by-600-foot lock and will inspect the culvert valves and all other areas of the lock that are normally underwater for any needed repairs. Corps employees will also replace the tow haulage system, used to move unpowered sections of barge tows through the lock. Kentucky lock is scheduled to resume normal operation at noon, Sept. 24, 2013.

Kentucky Lock’s upper miter gates at the top of this photo play a very significant role while maintenance repairs are being made in the dewatered chamber. They are holding back the waters of not only Kentucky Lake, but also of Lake Barkley as the Barkley Canal joins the two lakes upstream of their respective dams. The lock has been dewatered to permit TVA-contracted GUBMK Constructors to sandblast, make any needed internal structural repairs, and paint the 91-foot tall miter gates at the lower end. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Nashville District employees dewatered the 69-year-old, 110-by-600-foot lock and will inspect the culvert valves and all other areas of the lock that are normally underwater for any needed repairs. Corps employees will also replace the tow haulage system, used to move unpowered sections of barge tows through the lock. Kentucky lock is scheduled to resume normal operation at noon, Sept. 24, 2013.

GRAND RIVERS, Ky. (Aug. 19, 2013) – The 91-foot tall lower miter gates at Kentucky Lock was a beehive of activity today as workmen assembled wraparound scaffolding in preparation for making needed repairs on the gates.

“The Tennessee Valley Authority which owns the Kentucky Dam, Power Plant and Lock has contracted with GUBMK Constructors to sandblast, make any needed internal structural repairs, and paint the lower 91-foot tall miter gates,” said Mark Abshire, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Nashville District lockmaster for both Kentucky and Barkley Locks.

Nashville District employees dewatered the 69-year-old, 110-by-600-foot lock and will inspect the culvert valves and all other areas of the lock that are normally underwater for any needed repairs. Corps employees will also replace the tow haulage system, used to move unpowered sections of barge tows through the lock, according to Abshire.

“Our crews will inspect all parts of the dewatered lock, particularly the four culvert valves, and make necessary repairs,” said Greg Cox, chief of maintenance, Nashville District Repair Party. “We will also replace the tow haulage system, which will help expedite moving large tows through the lock,” Cox added.

The TVA owns the nine dams, power plants and locks on the Tennessee River and the Melton Hill project on the Clinch River and operates the dams and hydropower plants.

Corps employees operate and maintain TVA’s 10 locks and maintain 1,175 navigable river miles on the Cumberland and Tennessee Rivers. Nashville District also owns, operates and maintains its 10 projects on the Cumberland River and its tributaries.

Kentucky Lock closed for these repairs Thursday, Aug. 8, 2013 and is scheduled to reopen at noon, Sept. 24, 2013.

There is no auxiliary lock at this project. Shippers are advised to utilize the alternative route via the lower Cumberland River, Barkley Lock and Barkley Canal. Barkley Lock is on a 24-hour operation during this closure period.

Kentucky Lock will return to normal operation following this closure, according to Abshire.