NR 22-01: Nashville District conducting Floodplain Management Services Study of Trace Creek in Humphreys County

Nashville District Public Affairs
Published Jan. 13, 2022
This is Trace Creek in Waverly, Tennessee, Sept. 3, 2021 after it receded following deadly flooding when up to 17 inches of rain fell in the area Aug. 21. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Nashville District is conducting a Floodplain Management Services Study of Trace Creek in Humphreys County in Tennessee. (USACE Photo by Lee Roberts)

This is Trace Creek in Waverly, Tennessee, Sept. 3, 2021 after it receded following deadly flooding when up to 17 inches of rain fell in the area Aug. 21. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Nashville District is conducting a Floodplain Management Services Study of Trace Creek in Humphreys County in Tennessee. (USACE Photo by Lee Roberts)

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (Jan. 13, 2022) – The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Nashville District is conducting a Floodplain Management Services Study of Trace Creek in Humphreys County in Tennessee.

The Nashville District will look at site-specific data on obstructions to flood flows, flood formation, and timing; flood depths, stages, or floodwater velocities; the extent, duration, and frequency of flooding; information on natural and cultural flood plain resources; and flood loss potentials before and after the use of flood plain management measures.

The FPMS study is 100% federally funded. It kicked off with administrative tasks in December 2021, and field assessment continuing in January. The study is authorized under the provisions of Section 206 of the Flood Control Act of 1960, as amended.

Project Manager Ashley Fuentes in the Nashville District’s Project Planning Branch said the project will take approximately two years to complete.

“In 2022 we are focusing on getting hydrology and hydraulic models up and running. The overall purpose of the FPMS study is to see what makes sense and what could be possible answers to a reoccurring situation,” Fuentes said. “Examples of how the resulting information might be used is to improve building practices, make sure residents and officials are aware of where the floodplain is and have a better idea of the flood risk in a particular area, help the community understand where the dangerous spots are, and demonstrate to decision makers and agencies that Waverly and Humphreys County are serious about protecting themselves.”

Fuentes added that these actions can provide useful information for officials assisting residents that apply for financial assistance or that need help with flood insurance.

“Once the initial modeling is complete, the Corps intends to look at alternative measure to mitigate the flooding along Trace Creek.  If the community chooses to continue with any of the potential measures, there are follow-on opportunities for the community to seek federal assistance through various programs and agencies,” Fuentes explained.

The Corps of Engineers is authorized to provide a full range of technical services and planning guidance that is needed to support effective flood plain management. The cost of the FPMS Study is estimated at $110,000 in fiscal year 2022 and $96,000 in FY23.  

Thomas Herbert, Nashville District Plan Formulation Section chief, said the FPMS Study’s results will be used primarily to inform decision makers in Tennessee and Humphreys County regarding floodplain management along Trace Creek. 

Nashville District on the district’s website at www.lrn.usace.army.mil, on Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/nashvillecorps and on Twitter at http://www.twitter.com/nashvillecorps.)


Contact
Bill Peoples
615-736-7161
chief.public-affairs@usace.army.mil

Release no. 22-001