US Army Corps of Engineers
Nashville District Website Website

GORDANSVILLE, Tenn. (Aug. 13, 2020) – A group of volunteers and campers recently partnered with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Nashville District Park Rangers from Cordell Hull Lake to assemble bluebird boxes that will be distributed to recreational areas.
JAMESTOWN, KY. (July 28, 2020) The word is out. One of the best way to beat the heat in the Lake Cumberland summer sun is to splash the day away in the refreshing sprinkles of a splash pad.
INDIAN MOUND, Tn. (Jul 21, 2020) Engineers from Fort Campbell, Ky., load their vehicles at the newly refurbished Lock C on the Cumberland River to deploy to the Joint Readiness Training Center in Fort, Polk La. (Photo by USACE/Daniel Barrios)
CHATTANOOGA, Tenn. (July 23, 2020) – A monolithic effort to construct a navigation chamber at the Chickamauga Lock Replacement Project is heating up where the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Nashville District has already placed 19,000 cubic yards of concrete and more than 700 tons of reinforcing steel.
INDIAN MOUND, Tenn. (July 13, 2020) -- U.S. Army Senior Non-Commissioned Officers and Commissioned Officers from U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Nashville District and the 326th Engineer Battalion from Fort Campbell Ky., participated in leadership training today at Lock C on the Cumberland River.
SILVER POINT, Tenn. (July 1, 2020) – Officials celebrated completion of the last phase of repairs for the $353 million Center Hill Dam Safety Rehabilitation Project today where the Corps of Engineers recently finished constructing a roller compacted concrete berm to reinforce the auxiliary dam at Center Hill Lake, a secondary earthen embankment that fills a low area in the landscape just east of the main dam.
NASHVILLE, Tenn. (June 24, 2020) – The city of Nashville unveiled a historical marker today at the site of a navigation lock that went operational in 1907 to tame the Cumberland River, but where only remnants of its stonework remain visible on the shoreline.
NASHVILLE, Tenn. (June 23, 2020) – As part of a phased approach for reopening recreation facilities following COVID-19 closures, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Nashville District is opening additional Corps-managed day use recreation areas and amenities within the Cumberland River Basin in Kentucky June 29, 2020.

More Social Media

Suspicious Activity Reporting

iSALUTE LogoIf you have information that may be important to the security of the U.S. Army, Army facilities, or personnel. and/or if you wish to be contacted by Army Counterintelligence, click on the iSALUTE graphic to report suspicious activities affecting U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Nashville District property, facilities or people.

Latest Stories

Corps volunteers build bluebird boxes for Corps of Engineers recreational facilities
8/13/2020
GORDANSVILLE, Tenn. (Aug. 13, 2020) – A group of volunteers and campers recently partnered with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Nashville District Park Rangers from Cordell Hull Lake to assemble...
USACE campground sports new Splash Pad for fun and excitement
7/28/2020
JAMESTOWN, KY. (July 28, 2020) The word is out. One of the best way to beat the heat in the Lake Cumberland summer sun is to splash the day away in the refreshing sprinkles of a splash pad...
INDIAN MOUND, Tenn. (Jul 21, 2020) – U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Nashville District in partnership with Fort Campbell Ky., recently completed a $2 million project to upgrade the Lock C location on the Cumberland River in Indian Mound, Tenn
7/27/2020
INDIAN MOUND, Tenn. (Jul 21, 2020) – U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Nashville District in partnership with Fort Campbell Ky., recently completed a $2 million project to upgrade the Lock C location on...
Wigner named Nashville District Employee of the Month for June 2020
7/23/2020
NASHVILLE, Tenn. (July 21, 2020) – Ryan Wigner, civil engineer in the Water Resources Section within the Engineering and Construction Division, is the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Nashville District...

Latest News Releases

Army Corps of Engineers reports an increase in adult drowning at its lake and river projects this summer
7/9/2020
The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers announced today that more than 30 people lost their lives to drowning in June at lake and river projects the agency manages. The June statistics represent a 47 percent...
NR 20-020: Nashville District reopening beaches, picnic shelters in Kentucky June 29
6/23/2020
NASHVILLE, Tenn. (June 23, 2020) – As part of a phased approach for reopening recreation facilities following COVID-19 closures, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Nashville District is opening...
NR 20-019: Corps approves Lake Cumberland Marina expansion with finding of no significant impact
6/15/2020
NASHVILLE, Tenn. (June 15, 2020) – The U. S. Army Corps of Engineers Nashville District recently approved the Lake Cumberland Marina expansion after a National Environmental Protection Act review...

District Digest Stories

Click for Water Safety Information

Nashville District Videos

Nashville District Photos

(Left to Right) Rick Toole; Arlene Toole; Maj. Justin Toole, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Nashville District deputy commander; Katy Toole; and Col. Paul Kremer, Great Lakes and Ohio River Division deputy commander; pose right before promoting the major to the rank of lieutenant colonel during a ceremony at the Nashville District Headquarters in Nashville, Tennessee, Feb. 6, 2020. Rick and Arlene are Justin’s parents. Katy is his wife. (USACE Photo by Lee Roberts)
Maj. Justin Toole, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Nashville District deputy commander, watches as his daughters Mya (Left) and Caroline put lieutenant colonel shoulder boards on his uniform during a promotion ceremony at the Nashville District Headquarters in Nashville, Tennessee, Feb. 6, 2020. His father Rick and wife Katy watch the girls help to promote their dad. (USACE Photo by Lee Roberts)
Justin Toole, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Nashville District deputy commander and newest lieutenant colonel in the Army, poses with his family during his promotion ceremony at the Nashville District Headquarters in Nashville, Tennessee, Feb. 6, 2020. From Left to right are his parents Arlene and Rick, daughter Mya, son Ben, Toole, daughter Caroline, and wife Katy. (USACE photo by Lee Roberts)
Maj. Justin Toole, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Nashville District deputy commander, is supported by his family as his daughters Mya (Left) and Caroline put lieutenant colonel shoulder boards on his uniform during a promotion ceremony at the Nashville District Headquarters in Nashville, Tennessee, Feb. 6, 2020. From Left to Right supporting are his son Ben, mother Arlene, father Rick, and wife Katy. (USACE Photo by Lee Roberts)
Maj. Justin Toole, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Nashville District deputy commander, gets help putting on lieutenant colonel epaulettes by his mom Arlene (Left) and wife Katy during a ceremony at the Nashville District Headquarters in Nashville, Tennessee, Feb. 6, 2020. (USACE Photo by Lee Roberts)
Photo by Mark Rankin
Photo by Mark Rankin
Photo by Mark Rankin
The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Nashville District and contractor Johnson Brothers place the final concrete shell on the riverbed of the Tennessee River Feb. 2, 2020 below Kentucky Lock in Grand Rivers, Ky. It is the 10th concrete shell that is part of the permanent downstream lock wall and will double as part of a coffer dam for the Kentucky Lock Addition Project. (USACE photo by Lee Roberts)
Don Getty (Right), U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Nashville District project manager for the Kentucky Lock Addition Project, and Barney Schulte, the project’s lead engineer, monitor the progress of the placement of the final concrete shell on the riverbed of the Tennessee River Feb. 2, 2020 below Kentucky Lock in Grand Rivers, Ky. The Corps and contractor, Johnson Brothers, placed the 10th concrete shell that is part of the permanent downstream lock wall and will double as part of a coffer dam for the Kentucky Lock Addition Project. (USACE photo by Lee Roberts)
The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Nashville District and contractor Johnson Brothers place the final concrete shell on the riverbed of the Tennessee River Feb. 2, 2020 below Kentucky Lock in Grand Rivers, Ky. It is the 10th concrete shell that is part of the permanent downstream lock wall and will double as part of a coffer dam for the Kentucky Lock Addition Project. (USACE photo by Lee Roberts)
The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Nashville District and contractor Johnson Brothers place the final concrete shell on the riverbed of the Tennessee River Feb. 2, 2020 below Kentucky Lock in Grand Rivers, Ky. It is the 10th concrete shell that is part of the permanent downstream lock wall and will double as part of a coffer dam for the Kentucky Lock Addition Project. (USACE photo by Lee Roberts)
The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Nashville District and contractor Johnson Brothers place the final concrete shell on the riverbed of the Tennessee River Feb. 2, 2020 below Kentucky Lock in Grand Rivers, Ky. It is the 10th concrete shell that is part of the permanent downstream lock wall and will double as part of a coffer dam for the Kentucky Lock Addition Project. (USACE photo by Lee Roberts)
The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Nashville District and contractor Johnson Brothers place the final concrete shell on the riverbed of the Tennessee River Feb. 2, 2020 below Kentucky Lock in Grand Rivers, Ky. It is the 10th concrete shell that is part of the permanent downstream lock wall and will double as part of a coffer dam for the Kentucky Lock Addition Project. (USACE photo by Lee Roberts)
The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Nashville District and its contractor partner Johnson Brothers put a 1.7 million pound concrete shell into position Feb. 2, 2020 on the riverbed on downstream end of Kentucky Lock where it will be part of a coffer dam and eventually a permanent part of the new lock wall for the Kentucky Lock Addition Project. It is the last of 10 shells. The lock is located at Kentucky Dam, which is a Tennessee Valley Authority project at Tennessee River mile 22.4. (USACE Photo by Mark Rankin)
A diver enters the water to assist with the placement of the 10th and final concrete shell on the riverbed of the Tennessee River Feb. 2, 2020 below Kentucky Lock in Grand Rivers, Ky. It is the 10th concrete shell that is part of the permanent downstream lock wall and will double as part of a coffer dam for the Kentucky Lock Addition Project. (USACE photo by Mark Rankin)
The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Nashville District and its contractor partner Johnson Brothers put a 1.7 million pound concrete shell into position Feb. 2, 2020 on the riverbed on downstream end of Kentucky Lock where it will be part of a coffer dam and eventually a permanent part of the new lock wall for the Kentucky Lock Addition Project. It is the last of 10 shells. The lock is located at Kentucky Dam, which is a Tennessee Valley Authority project at Tennessee River mile 22.4. (USACE Photo by Mark Rankin)
The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Nashville District and its contractor partner Johnson Brothers put a 1.7 million pound concrete shell into position Feb. 2, 2020 on the riverbed on downstream end of Kentucky Lock where it will be part of a coffer dam and eventually a permanent part of the new lock wall for the Kentucky Lock Addition Project. It is the last of 10 shells. The lock is located at Kentucky Dam, which is a Tennessee Valley Authority project at Tennessee River mile 22.4. (USACE photo by Mark Rankin)
Lt. Col. Sonny B. Avichal, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Nashville District commander, poses with Kevin and Donna Jones Jan. 24, 2020 at Wildwood Resort and Marina at Cordell Hull Lake in Granville, Tennessee. The commander presented the Department of the Army Commander’s Award for Public Service for his actions to rescue a patron whose vehicle entered the water at the boat ramp Aug. 5, 2019. (USACE photo by Ashley Webster)
Lt. Col. Sonny B. Avichal, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Nashville District commander, presents the Department of the Army Commander’s Award for Public Service Jan. 24, 2020 to Kevin Jones, owner of Wildwood Resort and Marina, for his actions to rescue a patron whose vehicle entered the water at the boat ramp Aug. 5, 2019. The patron couldn’t swim, and Jones pulled the person to safety. The ceremony took place at the marina located on Cordell Hull Lake in Granville, Tennessee. (USACE photo by Ashley Webster)
The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Nashville District's 2019 Supervisory Training Program class graduated during a ceremony Dec. 3, 2019 at the district's headquarters in Nashville, Tenn. STP is a nine-month program where the participants share experiences and learn the core skills required to successfully manage the workforce and develop as a leader. From left to right are Frank Mills, Dylan Grissom, Myles Barton, Ryan Johnson, Stephanie Coleman, Bryan Mangrum, Chris Marshall, Kayl Kite, Cynthia Lightner, William Terry, David Bogema, Ryan Frye, Gerald Lee, and Lt. Col. Sonny B. Avichal, Nashville District commander. Graduates not pictured include Jamie James, Jason Phillips and Isaac Taylor. (USACE photo by Lee Roberts)
Jill E. Stiglich, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers directorate of Contracting, presents the “Best District/Center Award” to Lt. Col. Sonny B. Avichal, Nashville District commander, and Isaac Taylor, Branch Contracting chief, during the Society of American Military Engineers Federal Small Business Conference Excellence in Contracting Awards Program Nov. 21, 2019 in Dallas, Texas. (Photo by Angela Randall)
R.D. James (Right), assistant secretary of the Army for Civil Works, recognizes (Left to Right) Tim Dunn, deputy chief of Operations Division; Eric Pagoria, Construction Branch chief; and Kirsten Ronholt, Office of Counsel, for excellence during a town meeting Nov. 14, 2019 at the district’s headquarters in Nashville, Tenn. (USACE Photo by Mark Abernathy)
R.D. James, assistant secretary of the Army for Civil Works, meets with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Nashville District workforce Nov. 14, 2019 during a town meeting at the district’s headquarters in Nashville, Tenn. (USACE Photo by Mark Abernathy)
R.D. James, assistant secretary of the Army for Civil Works, meets with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Nashville District workforce Nov. 14, 2019 during a town meeting at the district’s headquarters in Nashville, Tenn. (USACE Photo by Mark Abernathy)
Tommy Long (Left), U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Nashville District resident engineer, gives an update on the Chickamauga Lock Replacement Project while overlooking ongoing construction to R.D. James, assistant secretary of the Army for Civil Works, during a walking tour Nov. 14, 2019 at Chickamauga Lock on the Tennessee River in Chattanooga, Tenn. The Nashville District is constructing a new 110-foot by 600-foot navigation lock at the Tennessee Valley Authority project. (USACE photo by Lee Roberts)
Dwayne Ponds (Right), U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Nashville District project geologist, explains the ongoing work to place concrete and construct a new navigation lock to R.D. James, assistant secretary of the Army for Civil Works, during a walking tour Nov. 14, 2019 at Chickamauga Lock on the Tennessee River in Chattanooga, Tenn. The Nashville District is constructing a new 110-foot by 600-foot navigation lock at the Tennessee Valley Authority project. (USACE photo by Lee Roberts)
R.D. James (green coat), assistant secretary of the Army for Civil Works, overlooks ongoing work to place concrete and construct a new navigation lock during a walking tour Nov. 14, 2019 at Chickamauga Lock on the Tennessee River in Chattanooga, Tenn. The Nashville District is constructing a new 110-foot by 600-foot navigation lock at the Tennessee Valley Authority project. (USACE photo by Lee Roberts)
A tour group with R.D. James, assistant secretary of the Army for Civil Works, overlooks ongoing work to place concrete and construct a new navigation lock during a walking tour Nov. 14, 2019 at Chickamauga Lock on the Tennessee River in Chattanooga, Tenn. The Nashville District is constructing a new 110-foot by 600-foot navigation lock at the Tennessee Valley Authority project. (USACE photo by Lee Roberts)
Tommy Long (Left), U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Nashville District resident engineer, gives an update on the Chickamauga Lock Replacement Project while overlooking ongoing construction to R.D. James, assistant secretary of the Army for Civil Works, during a walking tour Nov. 14, 2019 at Chickamauga Lock on the Tennessee River in Chattanooga, Tenn. (USACE photo by Lee Roberts)
Lyon County Judge Executive Wade White speaks speaks during a commissioning ceremony for a bio-acoustic fish fence Nov. 8, 2019 below Barkley Lock in Grand Rivers, Ky. The BAFF sends a curtain of bubbles, sound and light from the riverbed to the water surface, which deters noise-sensitive Asian carp from entering the lock chamber. Fisheries managers on the west coast of the United States use a similar system to guide the movement of trout and salmon from water channels. This marks the first time a BAFF has been tested at a lock and dam on a large river. Construction of the BAFF began in July 2019. The project involves multiple partners, including U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife Resources, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Nashville District, U.S. Geological Survey, and Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency. Fish Guidance Systems, a United Kingdom-based company specializing in fish deflection and guidance systems, provided the BAFF technology at Barkley Lock.  The BAFF sends a curtain of bubbles, sound and light from the riverbed to the water surface, which deters noise-sensitive Asian carp from entering the lock chamber. Fisheries managers on the west coast of the United States use a similar system to guide the movement of trout and salmon from water channels. This marks the first time a BAFF has been tested at a lock and dam on a large river. Construction of the BAFF began in July 2019. The project involves multiple partners, including U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife Resources, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Nashville District, U.S. Geological Survey, and Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency. Fish Guidance Systems, a United Kingdom-based company specializing in fish deflection and guidance systems, provided the BAFF technology at Barkley Lock.  (USACE photo by Lee Roberts)
Frank Fiss, Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency Fisheries chief, speaks speaks during a commissioning ceremony for a bio-acoustic fish fence Nov. 8, 2019 below Barkley Lock in Grand Rivers, Ky. The BAFF sends a curtain of bubbles, sound and light from the riverbed to the water surface, which deters noise-sensitive Asian carp from entering the lock chamber. Fisheries managers on the west coast of the United States use a similar system to guide the movement of trout and salmon from water channels. This marks the first time a BAFF has been tested at a lock and dam on a large river. Construction of the BAFF began in July 2019. The project involves multiple partners, including U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife Resources, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Nashville District, U.S. Geological Survey, and Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency. Fish Guidance Systems, a United Kingdom-based company specializing in fish deflection and guidance systems, provided the BAFF technology at Barkley Lock.  The BAFF sends a curtain of bubbles, sound and light from the riverbed to the water surface, which deters noise-sensitive Asian carp from entering the lock chamber. Fisheries managers on the west coast of the United States use a similar system to guide the movement of trout and salmon from water channels. This marks the first time a BAFF has been tested at a lock and dam on a large river. Construction of the BAFF began in July 2019. The project involves multiple partners, including U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife Resources, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Nashville District, U.S. Geological Survey, and Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency. Fish Guidance Systems, a United Kingdom-based company specializing in fish deflection and guidance systems, provided the BAFF technology at Barkley Lock.  (USACE photo by Lee Roberts)
Ron Brooks, Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife Resources Aquatic Nuisance Species Program director, speaks during a commissioning ceremony for a bio-acoustic fish fence Nov. 8, 2019 below Barkley Lock in Grand Rivers, Ky. The BAFF sends a curtain of bubbles, sound and light from the riverbed to the water surface, which deters noise-sensitive Asian carp from entering the lock chamber. Fisheries managers on the west coast of the United States use a similar system to guide the movement of trout and salmon from water channels. This marks the first time a BAFF has been tested at a lock and dam on a large river. Construction of the BAFF began in July 2019. The project involves multiple partners, including U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife Resources, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Nashville District, U.S. Geological Survey, and Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency. Fish Guidance Systems, a United Kingdom-based company specializing in fish deflection and guidance systems, provided the BAFF technology at Barkley Lock.  (USACE photo by Lee Roberts)
Maj. Justin Toole, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Nashville District deputy commander, speaks during a commissioning ceremony for a bio-acoustic fish fence Nov. 8, 2019 below Barkley Lock in Grand Rivers, Ky. The BAFF sends a curtain of bubbles, sound and light from the riverbed to the water surface, which deters noise-sensitive Asian carp from entering the lock chamber. Fisheries managers on the west coast of the United States use a similar system to guide the movement of trout and salmon from water channels. This marks the first time a BAFF has been tested at a lock and dam on a large river. Construction of the BAFF began in July 2019. The project involves multiple partners, including U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife Resources, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Nashville District, U.S. Geological Survey, and Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency. Fish Guidance Systems, a United Kingdom-based company specializing in fish deflection and guidance systems, provided the BAFF technology at Barkley Lock.  (USACE photo by Lee Roberts)
Charles Wooley, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Great Lakes Region 3 director, speaks during a commissioning ceremony for a bio-acoustic fish fence Nov. 8, 2019 below Barkley Lock in Grand Rivers, Ky. The BAFF sends a curtain of bubbles, sound and light from the riverbed to the water surface, which deters noise-sensitive Asian carp from entering the lock chamber. Fisheries managers on the west coast of the United States use a similar system to guide the movement of trout and salmon from water channels. This marks the first time a BAFF has been tested at a lock and dam on a large river. Construction of the BAFF began in July 2019. The project involves multiple partners, including U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife Resources, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Nashville District, U.S. Geological Survey, and Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency. Fish Guidance Systems, a United Kingdom-based company specializing in fish deflection and guidance systems, provided the BAFF technology at Barkley Lock.  (USACE photo by Lee Roberts)
Bubbles reach the surface of the Cumberland River on the downstream side of Barkley Lock in Grand Rivers, Ky., during a commissioning ceremony for a bio-acoustic fish fence Nov. 8, 2019. The BAFF sends a curtain of bubbles, sound and light from the riverbed to the water surface, which deters noise-sensitive Asian carp from entering the lock chamber. Fisheries managers on the west coast of the United States use a similar system to guide the movement of trout and salmon from water channels. This marks the first time a BAFF has been tested at a lock and dam on a large river. Construction of the BAFF began in July 2019. The project involves multiple partners, including U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife Resources, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Nashville District, U.S. Geological Survey, and Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency. Fish Guidance Systems, a United Kingdom-based company specializing in fish deflection and guidance systems, provided the BAFF technology at Barkley Lock.  (USACE photo by Lee Roberts)
Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (Left) and Congressman James Comer, Kentucky 1st District, congratulate each other after McConnell initiated a button to commission a bio-acoustic fish fence Nov. 8, 2019 below Barkley Lock in Grand Rivers, Ky. The BAFF sends a curtain of bubbles, sound and light from the riverbed to the water surface, which deters noise-sensitive Asian carp from entering the lock chamber. Fisheries managers on the west coast of the United States use a similar system to guide the movement of trout and salmon from water channels. This marks the first time a BAFF has been tested at a lock and dam on a large river. Construction of the BAFF began in July 2019. The project involves multiple partners, including U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife Resources, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Nashville District, U.S. Geological Survey, and Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency. Fish Guidance Systems, a United Kingdom-based company specializing in fish deflection and guidance systems, provided the BAFF technology at Barkley Lock.  (USACE photo by Lee Roberts)
Congressman James Comer, Kentucky 1st District, speaks during a commissioning ceremony for a bio-acoustic fish fence Nov. 8, 2019 below Barkley Lock in Grand Rivers, Ky. The BAFF sends a curtain of bubbles, sound and light from the riverbed to the water surface, which deters noise-sensitive Asian carp from entering the lock chamber. Fisheries managers on the west coast of the United States use a similar system to guide the movement of trout and salmon from water channels. This marks the first time a BAFF has been tested at a lock and dam on a large river. Construction of the BAFF began in July 2019. The project involves multiple partners, including U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife Resources, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Nashville District, U.S. Geological Survey, and Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency. Fish Guidance Systems, a United Kingdom-based company specializing in fish deflection and guidance systems, provided the BAFF technology at Barkley Lock.  The BAFF sends a curtain of bubbles, sound and light from the riverbed to the water surface, which deters noise-sensitive Asian carp from entering the lock chamber. Fisheries managers on the west coast of the United States use a similar system to guide the movement of trout and salmon from water channels. This marks the first time a BAFF has been tested at a lock and dam on a large river. Construction of the BAFF began in July 2019. The project involves multiple partners, including U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife Resources, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Nashville District, U.S. Geological Survey, and Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency. Fish Guidance Systems, a United Kingdom-based company specializing in fish deflection and guidance systems, provided the BAFF technology at Barkley Lock.  (USACE photo by Lee Roberts)
Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell speaks during a commissioning ceremony for a bio-acoustic fish fence Nov. 8, 2019 below Barkley Lock in Grand Rivers, Ky. The BAFF sends a curtain of bubbles, sound and light from the riverbed to the water surface, which deters noise-sensitive Asian carp from entering the lock chamber. Fisheries managers on the west coast of the United States use a similar system to guide the movement of trout and salmon from water channels. This marks the first time a BAFF has been tested at a lock and dam on a large river. Construction of the BAFF began in July 2019. The project involves multiple partners, including U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife Resources, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Nashville District, U.S. Geological Survey, and Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency. Fish Guidance Systems, a United Kingdom-based company specializing in fish deflection and guidance systems, provided the BAFF technology at Barkley Lock.  (USACE photo by Lee Roberts)
Preston Brust (second from right) and Chris Lucas (Right) of the country music duo LoCash pose with U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Park Rangers Jacob Albers (Left) and Brent Sewell at Old Hickory Lake in Hendersonville, Tenn, Oct. 19, 2015.  The group filmed a water safety PSA that features LoCash’s hit song "I Love This Life," which is currently moving up the country music charts. It is being used to support the USACE National Water Safety Campaign “Life Jackets Worn, Nobody Mourns.”
Country Music Star Dolly Parton performs at the Cordell Hull Dam Dedication Oct. 13, 1973 on the shore of the Cumberland River at the dam in Carthage, Tenn. According to an Associated Press report following the event about 2,000 people attended. Tricia Nixon Cox, daughter of President Richard M. Nixon, was the keynote speaker at the dedication.